Collaborative Consent and British Columbia’s Water: Towards Watershed Co-Governance

Published On: September 21st, 2017

Author: Merrell-Ann Phare, Rosie Simms, Oliver M. Brandes, and Michael Miltenberger

Released by the POLIS Water Sustainability Project and the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources, Collaborative Consent and British Columbia’s Water: Towards Watershed Co-Governance lays out a viable model for achieving a critical shift towards more equitable nation-to-nation relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous governments, with a specific focus on freshwater governance in B.C.

The report takes a detailed look at collaborative consent, how it differs from other collaborative and partnership processes, and includes case studies on how elements of it have been used in B.C., Canada and internationally.

Collaborative consent provides a powerful way to tackle difficult questions about how Indigenous and non-Indigenous governments can work together to make decisions about water and land use. It offers a way for B.C. to realize its commitments to govern according to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to develop a successful co-governance regime for fresh water through the specific window of opportunity offered by the B.C. Water Sustainability Act.

 

Collaborative Consent and British Columbia’s Water: Towards Watershed Co-Governance

Executive Summary

University of Victoria News Release

Media Backgrounder: Collaborative Consent